Hong Kong, Photolog
Comments 5

Getting Lost in Hong Kong

Hong Kong holds a special place in my heart. It was the first foreign country I visited as a young child, and it was also one of the first countries I visited over a decade later as a young adult.

This past February, I had the opportunity to go back to Hong Kong yet again for the third time. The last time I went to Hong Kong 4 years ago, I was a novice traveler. I hadn’t yet found my style of traveling nor do I know what I want to see or how I would see it. This time around, I knew. This photolog is my attempt to capture this multifaceted city called Hong Kong, with my iPhone 6 in hand.

Central District

One of the high point of my Hong Kong visit was losing myself in Central district. I had planned to visit for a quick congee breakfast and then moving on somewhere else – fast forward three meals and four hours later, I found myself rushing back to my hotel as my phone battery ran flat from taking so many pictures.

Central District

Right outside the Central MTR Station

Central District, as you may have guessed from its name, is far from a quiet place. By day is filled with hustle and bustle of working Hongkies, and by night it transforms into the popular party street that centers around Lan Kwai Fong.

Central District

Central District

One tip from me: Don’t forget to look up when you are getting lost here. You might miss a few things. Otherwise, just keep on walking.

Central District

Central District

Central District

Old shops in Central District

Graham Street Market, Central District

Graham Street Market

Graham Street Market

Have you ever seen a market so narrow and on a steeply inclined alley that barely qualifies as a street? Then you should visit Graham Street Market, one of the oldest market in Hong Kong. You’ll find vendors selling meat, fresh fruits and vegetables, but I wasn’t here to grocery shop so I mostly just walked around and tried to blend in with everyone else.

Graham Street Market

Graham Street Market

Graham Street Market

Graham Street Market

Wellington Street, Central District

Wellington Street in Central District

Wellington Street in Central District

I think Wellington street is one of the most picturesque part of Central District. But more importantly, this is where the two legendary Michelin-starred wanton noodles can be found: Mak’s Noodles and Tsim Chai Kee, conveniently located close to each other on Wellington street.

Wellington Street

Wellington Street

Causeway Bay

Causeway Bay

Causeway Bay

With over 7 million people packed tight in Hong Kong, no one can afford to waste any space and thus you could say most accommodations were on the “mini” side. In fact, one of the hotels I stayed at in Hong Kong is called just that – Mini Hotel, and it could barely fit the queen bed. I don’t know about you guys though, I found it strangely charming and simple. It stuck out as one of my favorite accommodations thus far.

Mini Hotel at Causeway Bay

Mini Hotel at Causeway Bay

Near Times Square in Causeway Bay

Near Times Square in Causeway Bay

I don’t think you can ever feel lonely being in Hong Kong, even by yourself.

Causeway Bay

Causeway Bay

An Alley in Causeway Bay

An Alley in Causeway Bay

Kowloon side – Hong Kong from above

“Whether viewed from Tsing Yi Bridge or the deck of the Star Ferry, from Victoria Peak or Lion Rock, Hong Kong sparkles here in all its multifaceted complexity, a city forever between worlds.”Leo Ou-fan Lee – City Between Worlds. My Hong Kong

So Hong Kong has got two sides to it – Hong Kong island and Kowloon. The Central District and Causeway Bay were on the Hong Kong island side, but by strike of luck my friend had a space for me in Tsim Sha Tsui area in Kowloon, so I stayed there for a day and got to experience both sides.

What’s the difference between the two sides? You could say that Hong Kong island is like what Manhattan is to New York City. Kowloon is considered the more urban side of Hong Kong, but it definitely has its own charm and glamour. I visited some of the most glitzy cocktail bars while I was on this side of Hong Kong.

Tsim Sha Tsui

Neon signs at Tsim Sha Tsui

Case in point – Aqua Bar. Though it’s very touristy, I couldn’t help but gasp in awe when I walked up the stairs of Aqua Bar and greeted with the impressive view of Hong Kong island.

Aqua Bar in Tsim Sha Tsui

Aqua Bar in Tsim Sha Tsui

Ozone at Ritz Carlton is also (I imagine) a very touristy place, but check out the view from what is supposedly the highest bar in the world – it felt like I was on a plane!

View from Ozone at 118th Floor

View from Ozone at 118th Floor

And that concludes my short 4-day stay in Hong Kong! I hope to be back again some day, especially to hike their amazing mountain trails.

5 Comments

  1. I’m a Malaysian studying in Hong Kong. Just wanted to say hi! Your photos truly capture the very soul of HK. Yes next time you should try the various hiking trails in Hong Kong! They offer a side of HK that I could never have imagined. you can try DragonBack in the summer, and Sunset Peak during autumn. Looking forward to more of your posts!!

    Like

  2. indingo says

    I’m only sorry I didn’t come across your blog while living in Shenzhen. Reading you from Portugal has an ever so slight taste of regret I didn’t get to explore Southern Asia as I should.
    You’ve got some really nice pictures, nice pace, nice blog!

    Like

Have something to say?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s