Australia, Northern Territory
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The Amazing Australian Outback: Alice Springs

This post is the fourth of a series of posts on the amazing time I had in the outback with YHA Australia in May 2015. You can check out ‘Northern Territory’ tag to see more posts from the outback and ‘Australia’ tag for any posts I will be doing on Australia.

The first surprise that waited for me right when I disembarked the plane in Alice Springs  was… the temperature. Coming from the hot and humid Darwin, which was only 2 hours away by plane,  I was not at all prepared for the drastic change to crisp 10C desert weather in Alice Springs. The weather actually reminded me a lot of the cool Southern California weather.

I wore only my sundress and a thin cotton kimono jacket and it was not enough. As soon as I got settled into my room at Alice Springs YHA, I immediately layered up and set out to discover the town.

Alice Springs Town

The first time I’ve heard of Alice Springs was when I visited Sydney in 2013. I was flying to Melbourne at the time and my flight shared gate with another flight going out to Alice Springs.

“What’s there to do in Alice Springs?” I asked my Aussie friend. “Nothing much really”, he replied.

Alice Springs is not at all a big city. The downtown area is even smaller, so small that you can walk to most of the attractions in Alice Town within 15 minutes. I was surprised to find a Target in the middle of the city, but soon discovered that despite having similar branding and exact look and feel inside the store, they aren’t the same as the discount retailer Target that is in the states!
But what I find the most interesting about Alice springs is the fact that it’s smack dab in the middle of the Australia continent. It’s equidistant from both Adelaide (South) and Darwin (North). Check it out on the map:

What’s more is that those two cities are the nearest major town to Alice Springs, and they are~1,500km / 930 miles away each. I have lived majority of my life in big cities, so this is just crazy to me. It’s also probably the furthest I have been away from the ocean, with the nearest one from Alice Springs being ~1,200km / 750 miles away.

I don’t think I realized just how large Australia is until I saw the figures above. This continent is MASSIVE, but there isn’t much civilization in the center of it. To illustrate this, Alice Springs has about 28,000 residents and this makes up for 12% of the population of the northern territory. Singapore, which is probably about as big as Alice Springs itself (I didn’t look this up, don’t shoot me if I’m wrong), has 5.4 million population.

Life here also seems to be very quiet and slow. I was walking around town center at 10am but there was hardly anyone around. If I was back in Singapore or Jakarta, the city would be bustling with people at this time. Again, coming from a big city this is so just bizarre to experience.

Alice Springs Reptile Center

Alice Springs Reptile center is one of the attractions of Alice Springs that I visited. It’s a pretty small exhibit, but they have very informative talks and we got to touch some of the reptiles like snakes and lizards. I learned that Australia has some of the deadliest snakes in the world, and the only one who has the antivenom for the snake bites.

Anzac Hill Lookout

The lady at Alice Springs YHA kindly informed me there is a lookout hill nearby, so after grabbing some breakfast I quickly made my way up there to check it out.

The stairs up to Anzac Hill Lookout

The stairs up to Anzac Hill Lookout

It was a pretty small hill that took less than 5 minutes to hike. But I was not disappointed by the view. The desert sky is a very beautiful crystal clear blue that afternoon. And since the city is flat, you get a 360-degree view of all of Alice Springs from this hill.

Alice Springs Downtown from Anzac Hill Lookout

Alice Springs Downtown from Anzac Hill Lookout

Later that day, I met up with my friend Nayoung whom I met in Darwin YHA and recognized me from Instagram. We ended up hitting it off well so we spent the day hanging out. We decided to go up to Anzac Hill to see the sunset.

Going back up the lookout for sunset!

Going back up the lookout for sunset!

Anzac Hill Lookout during sunset

Anzac Hill Lookout during sunset

On top of the hill, there is a memorial dedicated to those who served in World War I.

Anzac Hill Memorial

Anzac Hill Memorial

Playing with the super strong desert sunset

Playing with the super strong desert sunset

Outback Ballooning

The next morning I woke up bright and early to go for my first-ever hot air balloon ride. The folks from Outback Ballooning picked up on time at 5am while the sky was still dark and we set off to to the middle of the desert. Let me tell you this, it was VERY cold in the desert at that time. I was not prepared again (I suck at dealing with anything other than tropical weather) and spent the morning jumping around to warm myself up. Definitely bring a thicker jacket if you plan to visit in May!

Getting the balloons ready for take off

Getting the balloons ready for take off

It took longer than expected to get the baloons out, because they had to literally roll out the top of it, the colorful part which is called the envelope. Then, the envelope needs to be attached to the baskets which we would be riding on, and then they need to light up the fire and fill up the envelope with hot air, which is what makes it float. Science!!

Take off

Take off

It was still dark when we first took off but it seems that we were just on time for sunrise. Not long after our take off, the sky turned into this pretty blue-pink-orange gradient, indicating the sun is almost rising.

The dawn is breaking

The dawn is breaking

At this time I count myself lucky I’m not scared of height, because we were pretty freakin’ high up… but the view is phenomenal.

Outback BallooningOutback BallooningOutback Ballooning

After the ride, which lasted about 30 minutes, we had to put the balloons back together. Don’t worry though, we were also served some champagne, cheese and cookies before all the hard labor ;)

Getting the balloon back into the truck

Getting the balloon back into the truck

Outback Ballooning

Chilling out at the desert after our balloon ride

Chilling out at the desert after our balloon ride

I didn’t have any pictures of this because I was busy helping out, but basically we had to carefully push out all air from the envelope of the balloon, then fold it back together so that it fits into the back of the trunk. The envelope is massive so everyone had to help out!
Overall my first experience Hot Air Ballooning was a very enjoyable one. I definitely would do this again! Thanks Outback Ballooning for taking me!

Alice Springs Desert Park

Alice Spring’s biggest attraction is perhaps the Desert Park, and rightly so, because this place was massive!

In the park, there were multiple recreated habitats. For the birds, they are put in this massive dome and were allowed to fly around free. I got a ton of practice doing manual focus with my Lumix GF3 by stalking these adorable birds.

Alice Springs Desert Park

Australian Parrot, taken with Lumix GF3

Alice Springs Desert Park

Parakeet, taken with Lumix GF3

Alice Springs Desert Park

A couple of Parakeets, taken with Lumix GF3

The park also have some of Australia’s very own animals, like Dingoes and Joeys!

These Dingoes look just like an average domesticated dog, but they are actually wild animals. Even though they are found in Australia, they are believed to not be a native from this continent. Instead, they may have come from domesticated dogs from South East Asia and returned to the wild when they were introduced to Australia.

A young Dingo posing

A young Dingo posing, taken with Lumix GF3

Because dingoes came to Australia, they are also believed to have caused the extinction of Tasmanian Devil from mainland Australia about 500 years ago.

The two dingoes, taken with Lumix GF3

The two dingoes, taken with Lumix GF3

Joeys chilling, taken with Lumix GF3

Joeys chilling, taken with Lumix GF3

A family of Pricess Parrot

A family of Pricess Parrot, taken with Lumix GF3

I caught the Nature Theatre presentation at the Amphitheatre in the afternoon. Which featured free flying birds. It was impressive!

This one features a presentation of how the owls are able to fly very quietly, as to not give their location / presence away to their preys. This owl was flying over our head a few times and you really can’t hear anything!

A super lucky shot of Hedwig! Taken with my iPhone

A super lucky shot of Hedwig! Taken with my iPhone 6

And that wrapped up my one day visit in Alice Springs. I have to admit that coming here, I had low expectations. However I was proven wrong and by the end of the trip, I felt sad leaving this quiet town.

Next is Uluru, also known as Ayer’s Rock in the Red Centre of Australia.

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